It’s now available for pre-order on Amazon, Amazon.com: Navigating Conflict: Tools for Difficult Conversations: 9781637423387: Curry, Dr. Lynne: Books, release date is October 3, 2022.

Here’s the foreword by Pete Havel, author of Arsonist in the Office.

You’re reading this book by my friend Lynne Curry for one of a few reasons—you either want to help yourself for the future just in case you have to deal with THAT coworker, you’re dealing with that difficult person now, or maybe you’re trying to figure out why you’ve had trouble with certain people in the past.

When I began to write my first book, “The Arsonist in the Office: Fireproofing Your Life Against Toxic Coworkers, Bosses, Employees, and Culture,” I researched and quickly learned that there were many books written on problems in the workplace. Some provided practical tools, others relied on stories, and some were designed for just a manager or an HR professional.

Then there were Lynne Curry’s books. When I read Lynne’s book, Beating the Workplace Bully, she showed the ability to speak to numerous audiences, provide relevant information, and showed a knack for providing perspective that can only come with having consulted for some on the most powerful companies in the world in solve very complicated problems.

That’s pure gold for readers. No matter who you are, I can tell you that Lynne has dealt with and understands your side of the problem. And keep on reading because she not only understands the problem, but she’s about to give you questions to ask to help you solve or prevent them.

This book is going to force you to deal with the bad actions and attitudes of others, but what I like best about it is that Lynn also wants you to deal with what you can control—how you treat others and your inactions or actions that can start up all sorts of additional problems or make existing ones even worse.

That old saying of “It takes two to tango”? It applies every day to long-term messes in the workplace.

  • The young employee who got burned by their manager years ago becomes a manager years later, but doesn’t recognize they’ve adopted the exactly management style they resented. We can either understand what makes them tick—or react when the timebomb of their temper stops ticking and blows.
  • Or the employee who is bitter, angry, and disconnected. We treat them as landmines to avoid, or we can become friends, allies, or at least come to an ability to work together if we simply understood their past life experiences that brought them to that point.

Or we can do nothing and simply blame it all on them. We live in a world full of choices, but this book will help you make good ones about the things you deal with daily.

Communication matters. Understanding matters. And learning from the mistakes we make, the patterns of errors we make that we can either analyze or ignore, and creating better habits matters. Listening well, practicing the Golden Rule of good workplace communications habits matters too.

Trust me when I say that Lynne Curry’s experience as a workplace consultant on an international stage, her hard work helping millions of people through her columns and blogs, and her ability to equip you for the toughest situations and conversations will help you deal with tough times.

As someone who wrote a book about my experience inside a toxic workplace, I can tell you I did it so others would understand more about how to think and what to understand when they’re in the toughest, high-stress moments.

Lynne’s provided the same types of tools, techniques, and stories in the pages to follow. Soak it up, use it, and let her smart perspectives protect and position you for great things to come.

Pete Havel, President, Fireproofed Leadership

You’re reading this book by my friend Lynne Curry for one of a few reasons—you either want to help yourself for the future just in case you have to deal with THAT coworker, you’re dealing with that difficult person now, or maybe you’re trying to figure out why you’ve had trouble with certain people in the past.

When I began to write my first book, “The Arsonist in the Office: Fireproofing Your Life Against Toxic Coworkers, Bosses, Employees, and Culture,” I researched and quickly learned that there were many books written on problems in the workplace. Some provided practical tools, others relied on stories, and some were designed for just a manager or an HR professional.

Then there were Lynne Curry’s books. When I read Lynne’s book, Beating the Workplace Bully, she showed the ability to speak to numerous audiences, provide relevant information, and showed a knack for providing perspective that can only come with having consulted for some on the most powerful companies in the world in solve very complicated problems.

            That’s pure gold for readers. No matter who you are, I can tell you that Lynne has dealt with and understands your side of the problem. And keep on reading because she not only understands the problem, but she’s about to give you questions to ask to help you solve or prevent them.

            This book is going to force you to deal with the bad actions and attitudes of others, but what I like best about it is that Lynn also wants you to deal with what you can control—how you treat others and your inactions or actions that can start up all sorts of additional problems or make existing ones even worse.

That old saying of “It takes two to tango”? It applies every day to long-term messes in the workplace.

  • The young employee who got burned by their manager years ago becomes a manager years later, but doesn’t recognize they’ve adopted the exactly management style they resented. We can either understand what makes them tick—or react when the timebomb of their temper stops ticking and blows.
  • Or the employee who is bitter, angry, and disconnected. We treat them as landmines to avoid, or we can become friends, allies, or at least come to an ability to work together if we simply understood their past life experiences that brought them to that point.

Or we can do nothing and simply blame it all on them. We live in a world full of choices, but this book will help you make good ones about the things you deal with daily.

Communication matters. Understanding matters. And learning from the mistakes we make, the patterns of errors we make that we can either analyze or ignore, and creating better habits matters. Listening well, practicing the Golden Rule of good workplace communications habits matters too.

            Trust me when I say that Lynne Curry’s experience as a workplace consultant on an international stage, her hard work helping millions of people through her columns and blogs, and her ability to equip you for the toughest situations and conversations will help you deal with tough times.

            As someone who wrote a book about my experience inside a toxic workplace, I can tell you I did it so others would understand more about how to think and what to understand when they’re in the toughest, high-stress moments.

            Lynne’s provided the same types of tools, techniques, and stories in the pages to follow. Soak it up, use it, and let her smart perspectives protect and position you for great things to come.

Pete Havel

President, Fireproofed Leadership

Author, The Arsonist in the Office: Fireproofing Your Life Against Toxic Coworkers, Bosses, Employees, and Cultures

https://amzn.to/3CiQ2D7

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