Get Ready for a New Employer/Employee Reality: Things are about to change; What do we need to do to get ready for the recession?

The talent war seemed like it would last forever. Employers desperate to fill vacancies but unable to find solid job candidates; applicants receiving multiple job offers; employees expecting more from their employers and using their newfound leverage.

Both employees and employers gained as a result. Employers developed compelling value propositions to attract new employees and gained clarity concerning their mission and what they needed and expected from employees.

Employers took a fresh look at their pay, benefits packages, and training options. After they recovered from sticker shock, they reaped benefits in the form of engaged, high-performing employees. 

Employees landed jobs with employers that provided them tangible and intangible benefits in the form of competitive wages, enhanced benefits packages, work/life balancing flexibility and career-enhancing professional development.

But things didn’t work out well for some employers or employees.

My inbox fills each week with emails from ticked off employers that fought for employees who came aboard partially and skeptically, never  fully engaging.

“Quitter’s Remorse” (https://bit.ly/3zOaMlq) reveals that more than one employee felt, “I quit a perfectly good job and landed in a perfectly horrid one,” and “I’m hoping to return to my former employer.”

And things are about to change once again. We face a recession.  Employers, like employees, squeezed by inflation, can’t afford what their vendors are selling without raising prices for customers that can’t afford to purchase those products and services.

The employer’s recourse—slowdowns and layoffs OR getting smarter once again.

Meanwhile, employees that are losing the edge they’ve gained, that have lost some of their pandemic superpowers, need to get wiser as well.

How? Before you jump to a new job and employer, background check them as seriously as employers vet job applicants. If you work for a good employer, keep your job and make it better, by making yourself a great employee and by working with your employer to make your job better.

Finally, I’d like to hear from you. In posts like these, “Four-day workweek; is it in your future” https://bit.ly/3HpYhhCand “What Employers Need to Realize & Do” https://bit.ly/3zOaMlq, I’ve described what employers need to do better. What would you like to add to the conversation? Because things are changing once again. That’s part of why I wrote Managing for Accountability: A Business Leader’s Toolbox, https://bit.ly/3CTFTKV.

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(c) 2022 Lynne Curry

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5 thoughts on “Get Ready for a New Employer/Employee Reality: Things are about to change; What do we need to do to get ready for the recession?

  1. Who would have thought this just a few years ago???

    Recruiter reveals the secret to nailing your next job interview: Hiring expert says companies AREN’T looking for the ‘best candidate’ but rather people who are the least ‘RISKY’, as she shares tips for proving you’re the safest choice.
    Runa Jiang, a hiring manager from the U.S., often shares various tips and tricks for scoring a new position and giving the best answers in job interviews to TikTok.
    However, she left the internet stunned when she admitted that recruiters often don’t look for the most qualified employees.
    Instead, she said they’re on the hunt for the people who they believe will last the longest.
    She said recruiters don’t get paid more based on how well the people they hire perform, but if they give someone a job who quits soon after, it looks bad.
    Runa added that people with the most experience often leave quickly, so what can seem like a positive can actually negatively impact you during an interview.

    More:
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-10928453/Recruiter-says-companies-DONT-hire-best-candidate-job-looking-risky-person.html

    1. Larry, like you, I say “huh?” And then I realize that this recruiter is focused on what makes $ and not what ultimately helps the employer/employee most, which is to find the most qualified applicant who fits the job and thus will stay–as long as the employer also does their part.

      1. Agree. “but if they give someone a job who quits soon after, it looks bad.” seems more like “CYA” by the recruiter than concern about the long term health and success of the company and employees.

  2. To me, this was the nub and the most important part of this post: “Before you jump to a new job and employer, background check them as seriously as employers vet job applicants. If you work for a good employer, keep your job and make it better, by making yourself a great employee and by working with your employer to make your job better.”
    Things are going to change, but probably not in completely unrecognizable ways, and many long-time realities still will be there.

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